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, the official car and SUV of launch a "fully integrated and multidimensional  campaign that will communicate its 'Better Drives Us' philosophy and introduce consumers to the newest vehicles in its lineup." This will be Hyundai's 10th Super Bowl appearance in 11 years.
• The NBA has named Indianapolis as the site for the 2021 All-Star Game, to be played in Bankers Life Fieldhouse on Feb. 14. The next three NBA All-Star Games are in Los Angeles (Staples Center, Feb. 18, 2018), Charlotte (Spectrum Center. Feb. 17, 2019) and Chicago (United Center, Feb. 16, 2020). Cleveland said it would seek to host the 2022 game, which could be the 75th anniversary of the NBA event.
• The Disney Co. is acquiring major assets of 21st Century Fox for $52.4 billion. 21st Century Fox said it would spinoff "Fox Broadcasting Co., Fox Sports, Fox News, Fox Television Stations and a handful of other assets into a new company." The deal brings to Disney key assets of major properties it did not own, including Marvel's X-Men and the first movie in the Star Wars franchise (Star Wars: A New Hope). Also included is FX Networks, National Geographic, 300-plus international channels, 22 regional sports networks and Fox’s 30% stake in Hulu.

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Top-Selling NBA Jerseys Dick's Sporting Goods (Season to Date)

1. LeBron James Cleveland Cavaliers
2. Stephen Curry Golden State Warriors
3. Kevin Durant Golden State Warriors

4. Russell Westbrook Oklahoma City Thunder
5. Joel Embid Philadelphia 76ers
6. Kristaps Porzingas New York Knicks
7. Giannis Antetokounmpo Milwaukee Bucks

8. James Harden Houston Rockets
9. Ben Simmons Philadelphia 76ers
10. Isaiah Thomas Cleveland Cavaliers
11. Kawhi Leonard San Antonio Spurs
12. Gordon Heyward Boston Celtics
13. Kevin Love Cleveland Cavaliers
14. Karl-Anthony Towns Minnesota Timberwolves
15. Al Horford Boston Celtics

SOURCE: DICK'S SPORTING GOODS

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TOP SEARCHES IN U.S. ON GOOGLE 2017

Lists are based on search terms that had a high spike in traffic in 2017 as compared to 2016.
Athletes
1. Floyd Mayweather
2. Gordon Hayward
3. Aaron Boone
4. Paul George
5. Tony Romo
6. Aaron Judge
7. Gonzo Ball
8. Carmelo Anthony
9. Sergio Gracchia
10. Isaiah Thomas

Professional Sports Teams
1. New York Yankees
2. Houston Astros
3. Boston Celtics
4. Los Angeles Dodgers
5. Atlanta Falcons
6. Dallas Cowboys
7. New England Patriots
8. Pittsburgh Steelers
9. Houston Rockets
10. Philadelphia Eagles

SOURCE: GOOGLE

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NYSportsJournalism.com + Topic Of Requested Search

NBA; "Gift of Basketball' 'Star Wars Jedi' Ads Below

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CFB Title Games '21-24
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Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#JZxA5jXY4rCwemgZ.99
Let us not seek the Republican answer or the Democratic answer, but the right answer. Let us not seek to fix the blame for the past. Let us accept our own responsibility for the future.
Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/johnfkenn121400.html#46Ul8rBF4XpB4lo0.99
Wednesday
Feb242016

Survey: College ADs Face Fiscal Challenges In Supporting Fans, Facilities, Future

By Barry Janoff

February 24, 2016: College sports are big not just on campus but in business, marketing, media and the hearts and minds of athletes, alumnus and fans, with short- and long-term impacts on academia, finances, politics and society.

There are more than 190 million fans of college sports, the largest fan base in all sports, including 89 million female fans, with 31 million earning $100,000+ annually and 27 million in the 18-24 age demographic, according to sports marketing and licensing firm IMG College, based in Winston-Salem, NC.

In 2015, there were 20 universities that made $100 million or more from sports, up from 13 in 2014, from TV deals, licensing and rights fees, ticket sales, donations and other venues.

They are led by the University of Oregon ($196 million, including more than $300 million from alumnus Phil Knight, CEO and founder for Nike), Texas ($161 million), Michigan ($157.9 million), Alabama ($153.2 million) and Ohio State ($145.2 million), according to a study overseen by USA Today.

With that as an high-stakes, high-profile backdrop, university athletic directors are facing new challenges, including focusing more than ever on ways to grow and strengthen college sports while enhancing and optimizing the experience for athletes, students, fans and business and marketing partners.

Some 30% of college athletic directors said they had an annual budget of at least $50 million and 65% with football programs had budgets in excess of $60 million, according to a new survey, "Trends in College Athletics," from the Ohio University Center for Sports Administration in Athens and Los Angeles-based AECOM, an $18 billion firm that is a global leader in sports and business venue design and construction.

Among university athletic directors nationwide, 38% said that their schools plan to invest more than $10 million in upgrading current or new facilities over the next year, 29% plan to invest $50 million over the next five years and 50% plan to invest at least $25 million during that five-year period.

Also key among the priorities are enhancing game day experiences for fans and continuing to heighten the importance of academics among student-athletes.

The big hurdle, however, is keeping budgets focused in a changing  student-athlete environment.
 
“The data shows some of the unique challenges collegiate athletic programs face,” Drew Berst, director of business development, sports for AECOM, said in a statement. “Athletic directors are in the precarious position of needing facilities that serve multiple constituencies.

"Our data shows that athletic departments are increasingly investing in student-athlete education, and are seeking to maximize the revenue potential of their venues so they can rely less on university and public funding to support their programs," said Berst.

Concurrently, such fan amenities as food, beverage and premium seating are "increasing in importance."

Among fan amenities, the items of most importance included food and beverage (77%), high-tech connectivity (70%), premium seating (69%), improving the public space in stadiums and arenas (66%) and transportation (53%). The study stressed that "all fan amenities (were) perceived as important and are trending higher" among ADs.

As far as attracting new student-athletes, ADs put among the most important (in order) practice and training facilities, locker rooms, academic space, housing, sports medicine and lounges and cafeterias.

When it comes to the design and/or improvements of facilities, ADs said that the groups that had the biggest impact or influence were the NCAA, their respective conferences, college administrators and university policy makers, student-athletes, alumni and donors, competitor schools and recruits, per the study.

“This investment in growth is associated with a shift toward support for student-athletes,” said Dr. Heather Lawrence, associate professor of sports administration and the AECOM professor of sport business, Ohio University. “We’re seeing increased focus on the value of investment in the student-athlete experience both on the field and academically.”

The survey was conducted in November 2015 among 87 NCAA athletic directors from 25 Division I conferences. It is a follow-up to a "Trends in College Athletics" survey conducted in 2014.

Study: NCAA Athletes See Rise In Food, Facility Budget

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